Louis Lozowick

Hooverville
1932

Not on view

Date
1932

Classification
Prints

Medium
Lithograph

Dimensions
Sheet (Irregular): 14 15/16 × 10 7/8in. (37.9 × 27.6 cm) Image (Irregular): 11 3/4 × 8in. (29.8 × 20.3 cm)

Accession number
96.68.203

Edition
8/25

Publication
Printed by Jacob Friedland

Credit line
Purchase, with funds from The Lauder Foundation, Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Fund

Rights and reproductions
© Estate of Louis Lozowick, Courtesy Mary Ryan Gallery, New York


Audio

  • America Is Hard to See

    Louis Lozowick, Hooverville, 1932

    Louis Lozowick, Hooverville, 1932

    0:00

    Narrator: Louis Lozowick’s Hooverville depicts the shantytown that grew in Central Park during the Great Depression. Hundreds of homeless men lived in the camp, which was named for the president many people held responsible for the Depression. The encampment was on the site of an abandoned reservoir, which was later converted into the Great Lawn—one of the park’s grandest spaces. In this print, recently opened luxury apartment buildings rise above a man who seems to inhabit a space that is almost underground—stark reminders of the income inequality that characterized the Depression. In the lower right, a man lies on the ground—passed out or asleep. 



Louis Lozowick
48 works

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