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Edward Hopper

June 7–Dec 3, 2006


The definition of an American original, Edward Hopper created unforgettable images of everyday life imbued with an understated dramatic force. Through his extraordinary manipulation of space and light, Hopper's works hover between the theatrical and the strangely familiar. 

The entire fifth floor of the Museum is devoted to a large-scale presentation of works by Hopper, whose legacy is closely connected to the Whitney--home to the most extensive holdings of his work in the world. On view are not only the Whitney's most iconic Hopper paintings, but also an extraordinary selection of drawings and sketches made in preparation for these works. The Whitney's holdings are supplemented by key loans, including such major paintings as the Art Institute of Chicago's Nighthawks (1942), on view beginning October 4, and the Museum of Modern Art's New York Movie (1939).


Following an earlier incident, the Museum will open in a limited capacity from 3–6 pm on Saturday, February 4. Whitney Members and those who already have tickets for February 4 are welcome to visit. The Museum will resume regular operations on Sunday, February 5.

Sunrise

Sunset

A 30-second online art project:
Amelia Winger-Bearskin, Sky/World Death/World

Learn more

Learn more at whitney.org/artport