Art History from Home:
Picturing the Mexican Revolution

Thurs, Oct 1, 2020
12 pm

Online, via Zoom

As Mexico emerged from its revolution in 1920, artists looked for ways to respond to new formations of public life. Seeking to connect native culture and art with a modernist sensibility, new, sometimes romanticized depictions of peasant life took center stage. This session will explore how the work of Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, Frida Kahlo, Alfredo Ramos Martinez, and others sought to forge an art form responsive to the radical cultural transformations happening in Mexico at that time.

Xin Wang is a Joan Tisch Teaching Fellow at the Whitney Museum and a Ph.D. candidate in modern and contemporary art at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU.  She is the curator of numerous exhibitions in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, and her latest writings have appeared in Art in America, Art Agenda, and Wallpaper (Chinese edition). She is currently planning an exhibition that explores Asian Futurisms for the Museum of Chinese in America in New York City. 

Live captioning is available for public programs and events upon request with five business days advance notice. We will make every effort to provide accommodation for requests made outside of that window of time. To place a request, please contact us at accessfeedback@whitney.org or (646) 666-5574 (voice). Relay and voice calls welcome.

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