Whitney Biennial 2017

Solo en Inglès

Casey Gollan and Victoria Sobel

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Victoria Sobel: I am Victoria Sobel.

Casey Gollan: I’m Casey Gollan. 

Victoria Sobel: Casey and I are artists that have been working for a few years with the idea of text and the materiality of institutions.

Narrator: The artists respond poetically to the real, physical material of institutional buildings.

Victoria Sobel: Oftentimes we'll pick elements of buildings like bricks or windows to really further examine, in this case the artificiality of glass as a process which bridges the natural and the artificial, has been of extreme relevance to us in considering how that is a metaphor for analog and digital ways of thinking about text and language.

We've been thinking a lot about glass as a material, glass as a ubiquitous material, and as a type of extended metaphor for something that transposes visibility and a surface for writing and communication.

Sticker with white words and geometric shapes on window pane

Victoria Sobel: I am Victoria Sobel.

Casey Gollan: I’m Casey Gollan. 

Victoria Sobel: Casey and I are artists that have been working for a few years with the idea of text and the materiality of institutions.

Narrator: The artists respond poetically to the real, physical material of institutional buildings.

Victoria Sobel: Oftentimes we'll pick elements of buildings like bricks or windows to really further examine, in this case the artificiality of glass as a process which bridges the natural and the artificial, has been of extreme relevance to us in considering how that is a metaphor for analog and digital ways of thinking about text and language.

We've been thinking a lot about glass as a material, glass as a ubiquitous material, and as a type of extended metaphor for something that transposes visibility and a surface for writing and communication.


Casey Gollan and Victoria Sobel, installation view of Reflections, 2017. Vinyl, three components, 178 1/4 x 28 1/4 in. (452.8 x 71.8 cm) each. Collection of the artists. Photograph by Bill Orcutt