Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again

Solo en Inglès

“Andy's work really goes to the heart of the matter of what it means to be a human being and what our potential is…It's the real deal.” —Jeff Koons

Hear from a range of contemporary artists, curators, and scholars speaking about iconic works on view. Contributors include Jeff Koons, Hank Willis Thomas, Deborah Kass, Peter Halley, Sasha Wortzel, and Richard Meyer.

129 Die in Jet, 1962

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Donna De Salvo: 129 Die is amongst a number of paintings Warhol did beginning around 1960, where he takes the front page of the newspaper and makes it the subject of his painting. 

Narrator: Donna De Salvo. 

Donna De Salvo: Now of course the bold headline, the very spectacular nature of this plane crash, is one of the things that Warhol would have been attracted to. The idea of currency and what's topical is always key in Warhol's work, throughout.

Narrator: Like all of the paintings in this gallery, this one was painted by hand—Warhol wouldn’t start working with the mechanical process of silkscreen until the following year. But even his hand-painted works show a great interest in the technology of mass reproduction. 

Donna De Salvo: He's painting something to look like a photograph. And not only that, it's of early technology of the wire service where the photograph actually comes through electronically, and it never has the crispness of the photographs that we know today. 

A poster of a jet and text: 129 Die in Jet.

Donna De Salvo: 129 Die is amongst a number of paintings Warhol did beginning around 1960, where he takes the front page of the newspaper and makes it the subject of his painting. 

Narrator: Donna De Salvo. 

Donna De Salvo: Now of course the bold headline, the very spectacular nature of this plane crash, is one of the things that Warhol would have been attracted to. The idea of currency and what's topical is always key in Warhol's work, throughout.

Narrator: Like all of the paintings in this gallery, this one was painted by hand—Warhol wouldn’t start working with the mechanical process of silkscreen until the following year. But even his hand-painted works show a great interest in the technology of mass reproduction. 

Donna De Salvo: He's painting something to look like a photograph. And not only that, it's of early technology of the wire service where the photograph actually comes through electronically, and it never has the crispness of the photographs that we know today. 


Andy Warhol, 129 Die in Jet, 1962, acrylic and graphite on linen, 100 ¼ x 71 7/8 in. (254,5 x 182.5 cm). Museum Ludwig, Cologne. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York