Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again

Solo en Inglès

“Andy's work really goes to the heart of the matter of what it means to be a human being and what our potential is…It's the real deal.” —Jeff Koons

Hear from a range of contemporary artists, curators, and scholars speaking about iconic works on view. Contributors include Jeff Koons, Hank Willis Thomas, Deborah Kass, Peter Halley, Sasha Wortzel, and Richard Meyer.

Living Room, c. 1945

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James Warhola: My name is James Warhola. I'm one of Andy Warhol's nephews. I'm originally from Pittsburgh where Andy Warhol's from.

This is a painting he did in his college days. It's called The Living Room. It was for a project at Carnegie Tech; now it’s called the Carnegie Mellon University. 

Many of the projects at Carnegie Tech were really problem-solving ideas. This one was something that the teacher required him [to come] up with a fictional story of a family living in his neighborhood. What Andy did was he didn't really use a fictional—he actually used his own apartment, his own house, and his own experience for the basis of his project.

Everything's disheveled and a little out of order. There's no curtains on the windows, but that kind of probably showed the evidence that they were just a lower class family. But they did have means of entertainment, which was the radio. This family was also religious. They kept the crucifix above the fireplace. Of course, my grandmother would make doilies and little decorative covers to go under the lamps and things, so that is a little bit more evidence of the environment that they lived in.

Painting of a living room scene

James Warhola: My name is James Warhola. I'm one of Andy Warhol's nephews. I'm originally from Pittsburgh where Andy Warhol's from.

This is a painting he did in his college days. It's called The Living Room. It was for a project at Carnegie Tech; now it’s called the Carnegie Mellon University. 

Many of the projects at Carnegie Tech were really problem-solving ideas. This one was something that the teacher required him [to come] up with a fictional story of a family living in his neighborhood. What Andy did was he didn't really use a fictional—he actually used his own apartment, his own house, and his own experience for the basis of his project.

Everything's disheveled and a little out of order. There's no curtains on the windows, but that kind of probably showed the evidence that they were just a lower class family. But they did have means of entertainment, which was the radio. This family was also religious. They kept the crucifix above the fireplace. Of course, my grandmother would make doilies and little decorative covers to go under the lamps and things, so that is a little bit more evidence of the environment that they lived in.


Andy Warhol, Living Room, c. 1948. Watercolor on paper, 15 × 20 in. (38.1 × 50.8 cm). Collection of the Paul Warhola family. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York