Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again

Solo en Inglès

“Andy's work really goes to the heart of the matter of what it means to be a human being and what our potential is…It's the real deal.” —Jeff Koons

Hear from a range of contemporary artists, curators, and scholars speaking about iconic works on view. Contributors include Jeff Koons, Hank Willis Thomas, Deborah Kass, Peter Halley, Sasha Wortzel, and Richard Meyer.

Camouflage Last Supper, 1986

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Narrator: To make Camouflage Last Supper, Warhol overlayed a reproduction of Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper with a camouflage pattern. For Warhol, the most productive, creative way to approach the Last Supper was to respond to the way it existed in the present—not just as an art historical masterpiece, but as something that circulated in the media, and indeed generated controversy.

Donna De Salvo: There was a lot of debate at the time about the restoration of da Vinci's Last Supper, which had been restored many, many times, to the point where it was unclear in certain parts of the painting what was original and what had been restored.

Narrator: Donna De Salvo. 

Donna De Salvo: When asked about the restoration, which at that point was a great controversy amongst art historians—some who wanted to restore it, some who felt it should be left in its deteriorated state—Warhol preferred the deteriorated state of the painting. 

Narrator: This was one of Warhol’s last paintings. On February 22, 1987, he died from complications relating to gallbladder surgery. He was fifty-eight years old. He remains exceptionally influential, inspiring artists, designers, filmmakers, and others worldwide.  

Thank you for joining us today. Please be sure to explore the rest of the exhibition. You can see Warhol’s portraits in the lobby, and some of his videos, TV shows, and other works on the third floor. 


The Last Supper screenprinted twice and covered with camouflage paint.

Narrator: To make Camouflage Last Supper, Warhol overlayed a reproduction of Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper with a camouflage pattern. For Warhol, the most productive, creative way to approach the Last Supper was to respond to the way it existed in the present—not just as an art historical masterpiece, but as something that circulated in the media, and indeed generated controversy.

Donna De Salvo: There was a lot of debate at the time about the restoration of da Vinci's Last Supper, which had been restored many, many times, to the point where it was unclear in certain parts of the painting what was original and what had been restored.

Narrator: Donna De Salvo. 

Donna De Salvo: When asked about the restoration, which at that point was a great controversy amongst art historians—some who wanted to restore it, some who felt it should be left in its deteriorated state—Warhol preferred the deteriorated state of the painting. 

Narrator: This was one of Warhol’s last paintings. On February 22, 1987, he died from complications relating to gallbladder surgery. He was fifty-eight years old. He remains exceptionally influential, inspiring artists, designers, filmmakers, and others worldwide.  

Thank you for joining us today. Please be sure to explore the rest of the exhibition. You can see Warhol’s portraits in the lobby, and some of his videos, TV shows, and other works on the third floor. 



Andy Warhol, Camouflage Last Supper, 1986. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 6 ft. 8 in. × 25 ft. 5 in. (2.03 × 7.75 m). Private collection. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York