Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again

Solo en Inglès

“Andy's work really goes to the heart of the matter of what it means to be a human being and what our potential is…It's the real deal.” —Jeff Koons

Hear from a range of contemporary artists, curators, and scholars speaking about iconic works on view. Contributors include Jeff Koons, Hank Willis Thomas, Deborah Kass, Peter Halley, Sasha Wortzel, and Richard Meyer.

Paramount, 1984-85

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Narrator: In this painting, Warhol collaborated with the younger painter Jean-Michel Basquiat. They took turns working on the canvas. First, Warhol would silkscreen an image onto it. Then Basquiat would, as he put it, “deface” them—as he might have done to an outdoor advertisement when he was working as a street artist. 

T.J. Wilcox: But there's a kind of competitive spirit in them as well. 

Narrator: Artist T.J. Wilcox.

T.J. Wilcox: It's not just a group hug. And I think you see that particularly in his paintings of, the painting that he and Basquiat made together where, I know from reading the diaries and other descriptions, Warhol was often quite annoyed because he would print on the canvases and then Basquiat would come later and make his additions and they would go back and forth sometimes. And Warhol always felt that Basquiat painted over the best passages in the painting and maybe he did. So that duel, there's a kind of love/hate relationship in it, and I think you still see that playing out in the canvases now. 

Painting with many logos and colorful paint gestures.

Narrator: In this painting, Warhol collaborated with the younger painter Jean-Michel Basquiat. They took turns working on the canvas. First, Warhol would silkscreen an image onto it. Then Basquiat would, as he put it, “deface” them—as he might have done to an outdoor advertisement when he was working as a street artist. 

T.J. Wilcox: But there's a kind of competitive spirit in them as well. 

Narrator: Artist T.J. Wilcox.

T.J. Wilcox: It's not just a group hug. And I think you see that particularly in his paintings of, the painting that he and Basquiat made together where, I know from reading the diaries and other descriptions, Warhol was often quite annoyed because he would print on the canvases and then Basquiat would come later and make his additions and they would go back and forth sometimes. And Warhol always felt that Basquiat painted over the best passages in the painting and maybe he did. So that duel, there's a kind of love/hate relationship in it, and I think you still see that playing out in the canvases now. 


Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, Paramount, 1984–85. Acrylic on canvas, 76 × 105 in. (193 × 266.7 cm). Private collection. © 2018 Jean-Michel Basquiat Estate. Licensed by Artestar, New York. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York