Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again

Solo en Inglès

“Andy's work really goes to the heart of the matter of what it means to be a human being and what our potential is…It's the real deal.” —Jeff Koons

Hear from a range of contemporary artists, curators, and scholars speaking about iconic works on view. Contributors include Jeff Koons, Hank Willis Thomas, Deborah Kass, Peter Halley, Sasha Wortzel, and Richard Meyer.

Big Electric Chair, 1967-68

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Donna De Salvo: In 1967, '68, he made a number of electric chair paintings, repurposing the image that he had earlier used in 1963. 

Narrator: Warhol had announced his “retirement” from painting a few years before—somewhat ironically. In fact, he did continue to make paintings that recycled old subjects to new, experimental ends. 

Donna De Salvo: This idea of the optics and the kind of vibration that is created by the clash of these color combinations really enhances the—not only surreal, but almost sense of a psychedelia, of an almost kind of science-fiction view of the subject.

Narrator: In the late sixties, Warhol grew interested in using art in mind-altering ways. He also became increasingly involved with music and counterculture performance. Working with the band the Velvet Underground, he created a kind of avant-garde discotheque, with light and sound assaulting the senses. 

Red and green screenprint of an electric chair.

Donna De Salvo: In 1967, '68, he made a number of electric chair paintings, repurposing the image that he had earlier used in 1963. 

Narrator: Warhol had announced his “retirement” from painting a few years before—somewhat ironically. In fact, he did continue to make paintings that recycled old subjects to new, experimental ends. 

Donna De Salvo: This idea of the optics and the kind of vibration that is created by the clash of these color combinations really enhances the—not only surreal, but almost sense of a psychedelia, of an almost kind of science-fiction view of the subject.

Narrator: In the late sixties, Warhol grew interested in using art in mind-altering ways. He also became increasingly involved with music and counterculture performance. Working with the band the Velvet Underground, he created a kind of avant-garde discotheque, with light and sound assaulting the senses. 


Andy Warhol, Big Electric Chair, 1967–68. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 54 1/8 x 73 1/4 in. (137.5 x 186.1 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; gift of Edlis/Neeson Collection, 2015.128. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York