Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965–2018

Solo en Inglès

“The hope was for me as an artist to lose control, and to have my control exist at the level of setting up the experiment.” —Ian Cheng

Hear directly from artists and curators on selected works from Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965–2018.

Steina, Mynd, 2000

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Steina: All my works are actually inspired by tools.

Narrator: The artist, Steina.

Steina: So, this is also inspired by a tool. It is called Image/Ine.

Narrator: Image/Ine is video processing software that Steina co-developed.

Steina:  Image/Ine has many interesting things that are integrated into Mynd, but mostly, it was my discovery that if I distorted the image on the horizontal, it was totally different than if I distorted it on the vertical. So I decided to do both by comparison. Then it eventually grew into six channels that all had the same image material but are processed slightly differently.

The work is in four chapters, or four different divisions. Two of them use these prepared ocean pictures that are identically made, but give a very different result. In between them, I dispersed horses, because in Iceland, horses are very kind of remarkable creatures, and once you have warped them or stiffened them up in the landscape, they are even better. They stand there in the rain and the cold, stand into the weather, and it becomes very kind of spiritual, if you stand out with them in the rain with your camera and get totally wet like they are. So, that is, let's say, either [the] first, second, third, or fourth chapter. The last chapter, then, would be, I take kind of phenomenal pictures, like vapors and skies and water running and things like that.

Room with green projections on the walls.

Steina: All my works are actually inspired by tools.

Narrator: The artist, Steina.

Steina: So, this is also inspired by a tool. It is called Image/Ine.

Narrator: Image/Ine is video processing software that Steina co-developed.

Steina:  Image/Ine has many interesting things that are integrated into Mynd, but mostly, it was my discovery that if I distorted the image on the horizontal, it was totally different than if I distorted it on the vertical. So I decided to do both by comparison. Then it eventually grew into six channels that all had the same image material but are processed slightly differently.

The work is in four chapters, or four different divisions. Two of them use these prepared ocean pictures that are identically made, but give a very different result. In between them, I dispersed horses, because in Iceland, horses are very kind of remarkable creatures, and once you have warped them or stiffened them up in the landscape, they are even better. They stand there in the rain and the cold, stand into the weather, and it becomes very kind of spiritual, if you stand out with them in the rain with your camera and get totally wet like they are. So, that is, let's say, either [the] first, second, third, or fourth chapter. The last chapter, then, would be, I take kind of phenomenal pictures, like vapors and skies and water running and things like that.


Steina, Mynd, 2000. Six-channel video installation, color, sound; 16:38 min., dimensions variable. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Director's Discretionary Fund and the Contemporary Painting and Sculpture Committee in memory of M. Anthony Fisher and Anne Fisher 2003.307