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Today, Fri, May 22

Events

10–11:30 AM
Floor Eight
Touch Tour

Whitney verbal description and touch tours provide an opportunity for visitors who are blind or have low vision and their companions to experience the richness and diversity of twentieth and twenty-first century American art through vivid description and tactile opportunities. Ninety-minute tours are free-of-charge and are offered monthly on Friday mornings, beginning before the Museum opens to the general public. Please join us in our new home for a tour of our inaugural exhibition, America Is Hard to See.

Setting forth a distinctly new narrative, America Is Hard to See presents fresh perspectives on the Whitney’s collection and reflects upon art in the United States with over 600 works by some 400 artists, spanning the period from about 1900 to the present. The exhibition—its title is taken from a poem by Robert Frost and also used by the filmmaker Emile de Antonio for one of his political documentaries—is the most ambitious display to date of the Whitney’s collection, delving deep into the Museum’s holdings and challenging assumptions about the American art canon.

Space is limited, and reservations are required. Please contact accessfeedback@whitney.org or call (212) 671–1823. 

Related exhibitions
America Is Hard to See
Verbal Description and Touch Tours: _America Is Hard to See_
12 PM
Free Daily Tours
Related exhibitions
America Is Hard to See
_America Is Hard To See_: Floor Eight
1 PM
7 PM
Free Daily Tours
_America Is Hard To See_: Floor Seven

1 PM

7 PM

Free Daily Tours
Related exhibitions
America Is Hard to See
_America Is Hard To See_: Floor Seven
2 PM
7 PM
Free Daily Tours
_America Is Hard To See_: Floor Six

2 PM

7 PM

Free Daily Tours
Related exhibitions
America Is Hard to See
_America Is Hard To See_: Floor Six
3 PM
Floor Six
Gallery Program

Byron Kim, artist, will address Abstract Painting, 1960–66 by Ad Reinhardt (1913–1967).

Named in honor of the Whitney’s new address, 99 Gansevoort Street, 99 Objects is a series of in-gallery programs focusing on individual works of art from the Museum’s collection on view in America Is Hard to See. Speakers include artists, writers, Whitney curators and educators, and an interdisciplinary group of scholars. Programs take place daily.

Free with Museum admission.

Related exhibitions

99 Objects: Byron Kim on _Abstract Painting_ by Ad Reinhardt
6 PM
The Kitchen, 512 W 19th Street
Whitney Independent Study Program

Composed in 1988, Piano Sonata no. 6 is one of Galina Ustvolskaya’s most challenging compositions. The score consists largely of tone clusters and demands the performer aggressively strike the instrument, thereby speaking to the turbulence and violence at the end of the Soviet era.

This performance will take place during the Opening Reception for the exhibition S/N on Friday, May 22, 5–8pm. Admission is free. Seating is limited, and available on a first-come, first-served basis.

8 PM
Free Daily Tours
_America Is Hard To See_: Floor Five

8 PM

Free Daily Tours
Related exhibitions
America Is Hard to See
_America Is Hard To See_: Floor Five
8–10 PM
Floor Three, Susan and John Hess Family Theater
Performances

Written over 30 years ago Zones of Influence (1984–85) is a landmark concert-length work for percussion soloist, live computer-generated electronics, and auxiliary keyboard and glissando instruments. At the time a breakthrough in linking virtuoso electroacoustic performance with interactive compositional algorithms, Zones is now fully realized—thanks to new a software instrument called the Touché II that allows the dynamic dimensionality of the music to take full mind-bending, cosmological shape. David Rosenboom wrote the five-part epic expressly for superstar percussionist William Winant, who will perform on five live-processed percussion setups. He is joined by Rosenboom on the Touché II, piano and violin, while Jinku Kim provides an immersive video environment. Rosenboom describes Zones of Influence as a propositional cosmology activated in music. It is a prime example of what he calls, propositional music, a point of view about composing in which composers might build proposed models of worlds, universes, evolution, brains, consciousness or whole domains of thought and life, and then proceed to make dynamical musical embodiments of these models, inviting us to experience them in spontaneously emerging sonic forms. The compositional model for Zones of Influence is embodied in the form of an instrument; and thus, the model can be played. Winant and Rosenboom master this extended instrument with extraordinary dynamism.

Thanks to Leon Schneiderman for building and providing the Pink Butt metalophone instrument featured in Zones of Influence.

Propositional Music is presented by ISSUE Project Room in collaboration with the Whitney Museum of American Art; organized by Tommy McCutchon and Lawrence Kumpf with Jay Sanders, Curator of Performance at the Whitney.

Event tickets are required: $22; $18 members. 

Tickets
David Rosenboom: Zones of Influence