Please wait
Tagged with: Photography, The Future Whitney, History Of The Whitney

Picturing Progress: Building the Future Whitney

The Whitney’s new building site, December 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, December 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, November 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
South-facing view of the Whitney’s new building site from The Standard Hotel, November 2011
South-facing view of the Whitney’s new building site from The Standard Hotel, November 2011
The Whitney’s new building site, October 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, October 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, October 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, October 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, October 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The Whitney’s new building site, October 2011. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The construction team works on the first floor of the building. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The construction team works on the first floor of the building. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The view looking up from the first floor of the building. Over the next several months, the steel will be erected for all nine stories. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The view looking up from the first floor of the building. Over the next several months, the steel will be erected for all nine stories. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The construction site as viewed from the base of the southern entrance to the High Line. The new building will feature approximately 13,000 square feet of outdoor galleries stepping back from the elevated park. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The construction site as viewed from the base of the southern entrance to the High Line. The new building will feature approximately 13,000 square feet of outdoor galleries stepping back from the elevated park. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The construction crew works to erect the next floor of the Whitney’s future home, which will be a nine-story, over 200,000 square foot building. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The construction crew works to erect the next floor of the Whitney’s future home, which will be a nine-story, over 200,000 square foot building. Photograph by Ed Lederman
Cranes tower over the new building construction site, as seen from the Westside Highway. Photograph by Ed Lederman
Cranes tower over the new building construction site, as seen from the Westside Highway. Photograph by Ed Lederman
Another view of the bustling site from the northeast corner. Photograph by Ed Lederman
Another view of the bustling site from the northeast corner. Photograph by Ed Lederman
The view from above the construction site. Photograph by Timothy Schenck
The view from above the construction site. Photograph by Timothy Schenck
The new building will have stunning, unobstructed views to the west. Photograph by Timothy Schenck
The new building will have stunning, unobstructed views to the west. Photograph by Timothy Schenck
Standing under the High Line, looking out at the site. Photograph by Timothy Schenck
Standing under the High Line, looking out at the site. Photograph by Timothy Schenck

Progress is well underway on the Whitney’s future home—in a way that everyone can see. On May 24, 2011, Mayor Michael Bloomberg presided over a groundbreaking ceremony at the building site, which is located at the corner of Washington and Gansevoort Streets; construction began soon thereafter. Since September, the team has been working on a below-grade structure, which will support the building. 

Even a heavy building like the future Whitney requires a stable foundation on which to sit. The construction site lies in the Meatpacking District, an area of Manhattan, which was created by the city long ago by pouring landfill excavated from other building sites into the Hudson River. The changing water pressure from the Hudson produces tremendous force: after digging about a dozen feet into the ground, river water begins to seep out from beneath the landfill and into the construction site. To hold back this water, an underground wall is being built around the perimeter of the site. To prepare for it, the crew has been drilling long metal tubes called ‘piles’ approximately one hundred feet below the surface, which will secure the building’s foundation to the strong bedrock below.

Remember: the Museum will open to the public in 2015. Until then, follow along as we build the Future Whitney. 

ALL STORIES

Whitney Stories Video:</br>Vincent Punch
Whitney Stories Video:
Vincent Punch

The Future Whitney
Q&AWith the 2014 Whitney Biennial Curators: Part Three
Q&AWith the 2014 Whitney Biennial Curators: Part Three
Exhibitions
Q&A With the 2014 Whitney Biennial Curators: Part Two
Q&A With the 2014 Whitney Biennial Curators: Part Two
Exhibitions
Two of the Whitney’s Hoppers Keep the President Company in the Oval Office
Two of the Whitney’s Hoppers Keep the President Company in the Oval Office
Whitney News
Whitney Stories Video:<br>Renzo Piano
Whitney Stories Video:
Renzo Piano

The Future Whitney
Q&A with the 2014 Whitney Biennial Curators: Part One
Q&A with the 2014 Whitney Biennial Curators: Part One
Exhibitions
In Memory: <br>Cecil Weekes, 1956-2013
In Memory:
Cecil Weekes, 1956-2013

Behind the Scenes
Whitney Stories Video:</br>Larissa Gentile
Whitney Stories Video:
Larissa Gentile

The Future Whitney
“Am I As Much As Being Seen?” Fred Wilson Collaborates with Whitney Teens
“Am I As Much As Being Seen?” Fred Wilson Collaborates with Whitney Teens
Behind the Scenes
Whitney Stories Video: Fred Wilson
Whitney Stories Video: Fred Wilson
The Future Whitney
Construction Continues on the Future Whitney
Construction Continues on the Future Whitney
The Future Whitney
Exploring the Legacy of the Meatpacking District
Exploring the Legacy of the Meatpacking District
The Future Whitney
Raising Spirits
Raising Spirits
Behind the Scenes
Conserving Franz Kline’s Mahoning
Conserving Franz Kline’s Mahoning
Behind the Scenes

Behind the Whitney Stories Video Series
Behind the Scenes
Welcome to Whitney Stories
Welcome to Whitney Stories
Whitney News
The Future Whitney In Progress
The Future Whitney In Progress
The Future Whitney
Whitney Stories Video: Carol Mancusi-Ungaro
Whitney Stories Video: Carol Mancusi-Ungaro
The Future Whitney
A Space Without Walls: T.J. Wilcox’s Studio, Photographed by Marco Anelli
A Space Without Walls: T.J. Wilcox’s Studio, Photographed by Marco Anelli
Exhibitions
Vlogging About Art: The Whitney Video Blog Project
Vlogging About Art: The Whitney Video Blog Project
Whitney News
Words on Walls: A Conversation with Tom Black
Words on Walls: A Conversation with Tom Black
Behind the Scenes
Cubes and Anarchy: An Installation
Cubes and Anarchy: An Installation
Exhibitions
Picturing Progress: Building the Future Whitney
Picturing Progress: Building the Future Whitney
The Future Whitney
The Whitney Does D.I.Y. With Desert Island Comics
The Whitney Does D.I.Y. With Desert Island Comics
Whitney News
Mapping the Whitney in New York City
Mapping the Whitney in New York City
Behind the Scenes
Breaking Ground
Breaking Ground
The Future Whitney
Choreographing Community
Choreographing Community
Whitney News
Into the Future with <span class="caps">CHERYL</span>
Into the Future with CHERYL
Exhibitions
Cory Arcangel Re-Blogs the Internet
Cory Arcangel Re-Blogs the Internet
Behind the Scenes