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Richard Artschwager!

Richard Artschwager (b. 1923), Exclamation Point (Chartreuse), 2008. Plastic bristles on a mahogany core painted with latex, 65 × 22 × 22 in. (165.1 × 55.9 × 55.9 cm). Gagosian Gallery, New York. © Richard Artschwager. Photograph by Robert McKeever

Richard Artschwager (b. 1923), Exclamation Point (Chartreuse), 2008. Plastic bristles on a mahogany core painted with latex, 65 × 22 × 22 in. (165.1 × 55.9 × 55.9 cm). Gagosian Gallery, New York. © Richard Artschwager. Photograph by Robert McKeever

Come see Richard Artschwager’s sculpture, paintings and drawings, on view through February 3, 2013.

TAKE A SNEAK PEEK. . .

Richard Artschwager (b. 1923), Baby, 1962. Acrylic on Celotex in aluminum frame, 49 1/4 × 41 1/3 in. (125 × 105 cm). Kunstmuseum Winterthur, permanent loan from a private collection. © Richard Artschwager. Image courtesy Galerie Buchmann Basel; photograph by J. Littkeman

Before he became an artist, Artschwager had a few different jobs that included working as baby photographer for the Stork Diaper Service. He made this painting on Celotex, a ceiling-tile material with a fuzzy texture.

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Blps at the Whitney

BLPS? BLPS
. . .EVERYWHERE!

Richard Artschwager first created his blps—pronounced blips—in the late 1960s. Blps are oval shapes that he made to draw our attention to things that often go unnoticed. Artschwager’s blps made everything around them—as he put it—more “see-able.” In addition to a bunch of blps in the galleries, there are six blps inside and outside the Museum building. Can you find them?

WATCH OUT FOR MORE BLPS!

WATCH OUT FOR MORE BLPS!

Find more blps along the High Line. Take pictures of these blps and upload them to your For Kids profile page!

Download MAP MAP

This map shows you where the blps are, on and around the high line