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Hopper Drawing

Edward Hopper, Self-Portrait, 1899–1906. Charcoal on paper, 18 7/8 × 12 3/8 in. (47.9 × 31.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest  70.1536

Edward Hopper, Self-Portrait, 1899–1906. Charcoal on paper, 18 7/8 × 12 3/8 in. (47.9 × 31.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest  70.1536

Edward Hopper loved to draw from the time he was a kid. He drew from life, observing the world around him. He also drew from his memory and imagination, experimenting with ideas for his paintings. Hopper made this self-portrait when he was a teenager.

Check out Hopper’s drawing skills and powers of observation! Visit the Hopper Drawing exhibition, on view through October 6, 2013.

TAKE A SNEAK PEEK . . .
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Nighthawks, 1942. Oil on canvas, 33 1/8 × 60 in. (84.1 × 152.4 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Friends of American Art Collection 1942.51. Photography © The Art Institute of Chicago
Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney  31.426  On view in the museum  On view in the museum
© Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
In Early Sunday Morning, Hopper transformed an ordinary building that he often walked by in his New York neighborhood into a strangely quiet scene. Find out more about this painting
Seventh Avenue between 15th and 16th Streets, June 10, 1914.

A FEW THINGS THAT INSPIRED HOPPER:

People at cafés and diners.

Buildings with curved glass windows.

The architecture of movie theaters.

The view from his car window.