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Off the Wall: Part 2—Seven Works by Trisha Brown

Sept 30–Oct 3, 2010

Trisha Brown describes, in her own words, the works that will performed in conjunction with Off the Wall: Part 2—Seven Works by Trisha Brown.

Falling Duet (I), 1968

“One dancer falls over like a tree cut down (dead weight); the other dancer gets (scrambles) underneath and makes a soft landing with the total body surface, not hands. Stand, change roles, and repeat until too tired to continue.”

Skymap, 1969

“I had performed on the walls, the floor, and at eye level. I knew that the ceiling was next, but I just couldn’t bring myself to enter into that kind of physical training with that kind of danger below. I sent words up there instead.”

Floor of the Forest, 1970

“This is performed in a twelve-foot by fourteen-foot pipe frame across which are tied ropes densely threaded with clothes—sleeves are woven beneath pant legs forming a solid rectangular surface. The audience is free to move around in the periphery of the grid as the performers dress and undress their way through this structure. A normally vertical activity performed horizontally and reshaped by the vertical pull of gravity.”

Leaning Duets (I), 1970

“Couples, feet together, side of foot touching partner’s, leaning out to arm’s length, maintaining straight posture. Partners choose a direction, walking in that direction, touching side of foot together with each step. Fallen persons were hauled back up by partner while keeping foot contact. Rope device with handles also employed to achieve greater angle.”

Leaning Duets (II), 1971

“Couples facing each other, toes touching partner’s, leaning out with rope extensions, maintaining straight posture. Couples chose directions to travel in and instructed each other on what foot to use, going in what direction and precisely how big of a step to take. Maintained balance through instructions like ‘Give me some more [weight] or take a little.’”

Man Walking Down the Side of the Building, 1970

“A natural activity under the stress of an unnatural setting. Gravity reneged. Vast scale. Clear order. You start at the top, walk straight down, stop at the bottom.”

Walking on the Wall, 1971

“Dancers are supported by specially-designed harnesses that are suspended by cables from trolleys that travel on tracks attached to the ceiling. The dancers walk, jump, and run along the gallery walls, parallel to the floor.”

Accumulation, 1971

“Movement one, rotation of the first with the thumb extended, was begun and repeated seven or eight times. Movement two was added and one and two were repeated eight times. Then movement three was added and one, two, and three were repeated, eventually bringing into play the entire body.”

Spanish Dance, 1973

“A dancer slowly raises arms like a magnificent Spanish dancer and travels forward in time to Bob Dylan’s “Early Mornin’ Rain.” When dancer A touches up against the back of dancer B, dancer B slowly raises her arms like a magnificent Spanish dancer and the two travel forward, touching up against the back of dancer C, and so on, until they all reach the wall."