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Access Programs

Verbal Description and Touch Tour: Hopper Drawing

Thurs, Aug 29, 2013  5:30–7:30 PM

Whitney verbal description tours provide an opportunity for visitors who are blind or low vision and their companions to experience the richness and diversity of 20th and 21st century American art through vivid description and tactile opportunities. Please join us for a tour of Hopper Drawing. The tour begins at 6 pm, with a pre-tour reception at 5:30 pm.

Hopper Drawing is the first major museum exhibition to focus on the drawings and creative process of Edward Hopper (1882–1967). More than anything else, Hopper’s drawings reveal the continually evolving relationship between observation and invention in the artist’s work, and his abiding interest in the spaces and motifs—the street, the movie theatre, the office, the bedroom, the road—that he would return to throughout his career as an artist. This exhibition showcases the Whitney’s unparalleled collection of Hopper’s work, which includes over 2,500 drawings bequeathed to the museum by his widow Josephine Hopper, many of which have never before been exhibited or researched. The exhibition surveys Hopper’s significant and underappreciated achievements as a draftsman, and pairs many of his greatest oil paintings, including Early Sunday Morning (1930), New York Movie (1939), Office at Night (1940) and Nighthawks (1942), with their preparatory drawings and related works. This exhibition also features groundbreaking archival research into the buildings, spaces and urban environments that inspired his work.

The Whitney is located at 945 Madison Avenue at 75th Street. This event is free of charge. Please call (212) 570-7789 or email AccessFeedback@Whitney.org to RSVP or learn more. Space is limited.


Participants explore a tactile diagram of Charles Demuth's My Egypt (1927) on a touch and verbal description tour. Photograph by Matthew Carasella, 2013

Participants explore a tactile diagram of Charles Demuth’s My Egypt (1927) on a touch and verbal description tour. Photograph by Matthew Carasella, 2013