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Andrea Geyer: Time Tenderness

In Time Tenderness, a program of performances that will take place in the Museum’s galleries from May 13 to 18, artist Andrea Geyer works with performers Omagbitse Omagbemi, Lily Gold, and Jess Barbagallo to reanimate the continuously forgotten history of women’s roles in American culture. On the occasion of the inauguration of the Whitney’s new building, Geyer’s project seeks to materialize Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney’s visionary belief that any country needs culture and art to recognize and foster its own identity. Geyer has researched various sources, including the writings of Mrs. Whitney, to create a work in which the performers use movement, text, and song to engage with individual works in the exhibition America is Hard to See. Focusing on the legacy of Mrs. Whitney and Juliana Force, the Museum’s first director, who together fostered a community of artists that became the foundation of the Whitney Museum, Geyer asks visitors to recognize the museum not only as a place for looking at art, but as a site in which meaning is actively and continuously created. The project emerges from Geyer’s enduring commitment to recognizing and recovering the transformative role of women in championing modern art and in building the institutions that have sustained it in the United States.

Related Program: Andrea Geyer: It’s time, she said., a project created in dialogue with America Is Hard to See.

May 13–18
3 pm

The performance begins on Floor Eight at 3pm, and will move through each gallery floor. Free with Museum admission.

Andrea Geyer (b. 1971), rehearsal photograph for Time Tenderness, 2015. Photograph by Andrea Geyer

Andrea Geyer (b. 1971), rehearsal photograph for Time Tenderness, 2015. Photograph by Andrea Geyer

Sources

Avis Berman, Rebels on Eigth Street: Juliana Force and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Atheneum, 1990.

Flora Biddle, excerpts from remarks at the Dedication of the Whitney Museum of American Art, April 30th, 2015.

Wendy Brown, Politics Out of History. Princeton University Press, 2001.

Fred Moten, “Hand Up To Your Ear”, from Protocols for the Sound of Freedom by Ultra-red.

Michelle Obama, excerpts from remarks at the Dedication of the Whitney Museum of American Art, April 30th, 2015.

Diary of Nancy Elizabeth Prophet
(1922–1934). Brown University Library, Center for Digital Scholarship.

De W.C. Ward, “Poor Little Rich Girl and Her Art; Mrs. Harry Payne Whitney's Struggles to Be Taken Seriously as a Sculptor Without Having Starved in a Garret,” The New York Times, November 9, 1919.

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, “The End of America’s Apprenticeship in Art,” Arts and Decoration, 1920.

Ian White.