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Lizzie

Lizzie was born in Eger, Hungary, and she came to New York when she was eighteen months old. She loves large-scale painting, dancing, tennis, photography, and spending her time in museums. Looking at art inspires her, and her favorite artists are Edgar Degas and Claude Monet. Lizzie is also fascinated by people doing ordinary things, and she draws inspiration from everyday life, whether it’s walking the streets of New York or exploring the countryside of Ireland.  She enjoys experimenting with digital photography and is interested in mixed media. Lizzie believes art means expressing yourself in your own unique, creative way. One day she hopes to be an art teacher for young children or an art therapist. She is thrilled to be part of Youth Insights.

Lizzie’s Artwork

Untitled (detail)
Lizzie
YI Artist, Fall 2012
Camera, printing paper
The assignment was to create a piece that makes a statement about the future. The two photographs show that you can’t plan out your future and obstacles may get in the way, but it’s important to take time out and reflect on your life. During the process of making this project I used my digital camera. The pictures were then printed on glossy photo paper. The pictures were color and black and white. I took about 40-50 shots and at the end I selected only 4. I learned that it’s important to take many pictures and to look closely in order to shape the image that I want to appear in my work.
Untitled (detail)
Lizzie
YI Artist, Fall 2012

Camera, printing paper

The assignment was to create a piece that makes a statement about the future. The two photographs show that you can’t plan out your future and obstacles may get in the way, but it’s important to take time out and reflect on your life. During the process of making this project I used my digital camera. The pictures were then printed on glossy photo paper. The pictures were color and black and white. I took about 40-50 shots and at the end I selected only 4. I learned that it’s important to take many pictures and to look closely in order to shape the image that I want to appear in my work.

Untitled (detail)
Untitled (detail)
Broken or The Other Half 
Lizzie
YI Artist, Fall 2012
Plastic cups and hot glue
For this project, I chose two plastic wine glasses because the texture stood out to me and was unusual for plastic glasses. These glasses had probably been through the dishwasher by mistake and the plastic had a crinkly, lacy texture under the smooth surface. The plastic was then cut in half, and I arranged the pieces and used a hot glue gun to secure them together, creating a sculpture that will hang in relief from the wall. During the process, I used plastic wine glasses and glue. I experimented with different types of glue, and through trial and error, I finally worked with a hot glue gun to bind the pieces together. Trial and error is an important part of making art.
Broken or The Other Half
Lizzie
YI Artist, Fall 2012

Plastic cups and hot glue

For this project, I chose two plastic wine glasses because the texture stood out to me and was unusual for plastic glasses. These glasses had probably been through the dishwasher by mistake and the plastic had a crinkly, lacy texture under the smooth surface. The plastic was then cut in half, and I arranged the pieces and used a hot glue gun to secure them together, creating a sculpture that will hang in relief from the wall. During the process, I used plastic wine glasses and glue. I experimented with different types of glue, and through trial and error, I finally worked with a hot glue gun to bind the pieces together. Trial and error is an important part of making art.

YI Artists worked with artist in residence Beth Campbell on a variety of projects inspired by Beth’s own artistic investigations. To learn more about these projects, please click through. Photograph by Correna Cohen
YI Artists worked with artist in residence Beth Campbell on a variety of projects inspired by Beth’s own artistic investigations. To learn more about these projects, please click through. Photograph by Correna Cohen