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Edward Hopper

1882–1967

about this artist

One of the most important realists of the twentieth century, Edward Hopper painted intimate scenes of American life in a career that spanned over six decades. From 1900 to 1906, Hopper attended the New York School of Art, where he studied painting with urban realist Robert Henri. Hopper spent three extended sojourns in Paris between 1906 and 1910, his only trips abroad. While there, he visited avant-garde exhibitions such as the Salon des Indépendants and the Salon d’Automne, but he was more influenced by the work of Edgar Degas and the Impressionists than the period’s contemporary movements such as fauvism and cubism.

Hopper’s success as an illustrator and printmaker during the 1910s led him to begin painting realistic scenes of urban and rural America. By the 1920s, he was rendering these subjects in his characteristically spare and direct manner, emphasizing contrasts between light and shadow and unusual vantage points through the use of windows and doorways. Hopper’s isolated figures, estranged couples, and stark rooms imbue his images with a deep sense of mystery, loneliness, and solitude. Hopper had his first solo exhibition in January 1920 at the Whitney Studio Club in Greenwich Village, a hub for independent artists and the precursor to the modern Whitney Museum. In 1924, a successful New York gallery exhibition enabled him to give up commercial work altogether and concentrate full-time on painting. That same year, Hopper married Josephine Verstille Nivison, a painter who would be the model for almost every female figure he subsequently painted.

Throughout his career, Hopper returned again and again to the same subjects. Cape Cod, where he and Jo spent their summers, inspired paintings of lighthouses, rocky coasts, railroads, and New England houses. In New York, where he lived and worked in the same apartment overlooking Washington Square for more than fifty years, Hopper depicted the everyday sites of the modern city—movie theaters, restaurants, shops, and apartment interiors. Through a poetic, cinematic use of light and architecture, Hopper invested his scenes of ordinary American life with a haunting sense of drama and desolation. While American art in the 1950s and 60s moved away from traditional realism, Hopper had little interest in contemporary movements like Abstract Expressionism or Pop art. “The inner life of a human being is a vast and varied realm and does not concern itself alone with stimulating arrangements of color, form, and design,” he said. “Painting will have to deal more fully and less obliquely with life and nature’s phenomena before it can again become great.”

Edward Hopper interview, 1959 June 17, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/oralhistories/transcripts/hopper59.htm 

Edward Hopper, New York Interior, c. 1921  70.1200  
Edward Hopper, New York Interior, c. 1921  70.1200  On view
Edward Hopper, Night Shadows, 1921  70.1048
Edward Hopper, Night Shadows, 1921  70.1048
Edward Hopper, East Side Interior, 1922  70.1020
Edward Hopper, East Side Interior, 1922  70.1020
Edward Hopper, Artist’s ledger—Book III, 1924–67 (detail)  96.210a-hhhh
Edward Hopper, Artist’s ledger—Book III, 1924–67 (detail)  96.210a-hhhh
Edward Hopper, Self Portrait, 1925–30  70.1165  
Edward Hopper, Self Portrait, 1925–30  70.1165  On view
Edward Hopper, Railroad Sunset, 1929  70.1170
Edward Hopper, Railroad Sunset, 1929  70.1170
Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930  31.426  
Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930  31.426  On view For Teachers
Edward Hopper, Seven A.M., 1948  50.8
Edward Hopper, Seven A.M., 1948  50.8